Ongoing projects

MAJOR STRUCTURING PROJECT THEME 1

EFFECTS FO BISPHOSPONATES AND / OR POLYPHENOLS ON ORAL HEALTH

Project
Validation of a new strategy to repair jaw bone voids in the presence of antiresorptive-induced osteonecrosis

Janet Henderson, McGill University Health Centre, Principal Investigator
Caroline Hoemann, École polytechnique
Nicolas Makhoul, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Paul Martineau, Surgery (Orthopaedics), McGill University
Basil Favis, École polytechnique

In collaboration with the Fondation de l’Ordre des dentistes du Québec

Osteonecrosis of the jaw was recognized about a decade ago as an adverse effect in patients receiving long-term, low dose bisphosphonate therapy to treat osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw is acknowledged to be a serious and debilitating complication in more than 10% of patients receiving IV bisphosphonate therapy to inhibit bone resorption in primary and metastatic bone cancer
This major structuring project aims to modify a rat model to create similar defects in the jaw using biphosphonate. The purpose is to develop a bioactive matrix aimed at regenerating bone and promoting its neovascularisation in order to allow the repair of mandibular defects. The study will compare the effectiveness of a classical matrix and the new bioactive matrix.

MAJOR STRUTURING PROJECT THEME 3

STUDY ON THE TRANSITION OF ACUTE PAIN TO CHRONIC OROFACIAL OR BONE PAIN

Project
The transition from acute to chronic pain in chronic painful temporomandibular joint disorders: a prospective cohort study

Dr. Ana Velly Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University and Department of Dentistry, Jewish General Hospital, Principal Investigator
Mary Ellen Macdonald, Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Dr. Mervyn Gornitsky, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University and Department of Dentistry, Jewish General Hospital
Petra Schweinhardt, Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain and Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Ji Zhang, Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Zovinar der Khatchadourian, Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Eric Schiffman, Division of TMD and Orofacial Pain, University of Minnesota

In collaboration with the Quebec Pain Research Network

The purpose of this prospective cohort study is to identify risk factors for the transition of acute to chronic pain, as well as its persistence, in painful temporomandibular disorders (PTMD).

The research team carries out a prospective cohort study which investigates PTMD subjects from 18 to 70 years old over a period of 3 months. The team looks at factors such as trauma baseline, the intensity of pain, psychological factors and co-morbidities. Biomarkers will be also measured in saliva of participants.

The results of this study are expected to highlight the risk factors, salivary biomarkers and microbiomes oral profiles that predict the transition of acute pain to chronic in the PTMD, as well as its persistence. The research team will also determine the influence of the oral microbiome on salivary biomarkers that are involved in this transition and its persistence.

MAJOR STRUCTURING PROJECT THEME 4

RARE DISEASES AFFECTING THE MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM

Project
Identification of new skeletal dysplasia genes and pathophysiological mechanisms

Philippe Campeau, University of Montréal and Ste -Justine University Hospital, Principal Investigator
Frank Rauch, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, and Shriners Hospital for children in Montréal
Monzur Murshed, Department of Medicine and Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, and Shriners Hospital for children in Montréal
Marc McKee, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University

There are over 450 different skeletal dysplasias (malformations resulting of an abnormality in the development of bone that occurs after birth), the etiology of which has yet to be determined for at least 50 of them. Together, they affect 1/5,000 individual. Improved understanding of skeletal dysplasias will help us to understand key pathways in skeletogenesis and to provide better counseling to the affected families.
The first objective of this major structuring project is to identify new genes responsible of dysplasia in humans. Full exomes will be performed in some subjects who do not have the known mutations and who consent to participate in the study. The team intends to study 20 probands (first person detected with the presence of a genetic condition, and which serves as a starting point for a genetic investigation of this affection) during the first year. If interesting genes are detected, models will be developed in mice.
The team will perform in parallel studies in animal models in order to better understand the role of certain mutations as well as of one enzyme involved in the metabolism of lipids in the development of bone.

MAJOR STRUCTURING PROJECT THEME 5

ACCESSIBILITY TO ORAL CARE FOR VULNERABLE CLIENTELES: FEASIBILITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENT MODELS OF ORGANIZATION OF CARE IN THE QUEBEC CONTEXT
Project
Québec Cree communities’ primary oral health care: a participatory evaluation

Elham Emami, (University of Montréal), Principal Investigator
Louise Potvin, Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montréal
Christine Loignon, Department of Family Medicine, University of Sherbrooke
Félix Girard, Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montréal
Yves Couturier, School of Social Work, University of Sherbrooke
Mary Ellen Macdonald, Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Christopher Fletcher, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University
Marie-Pierre Bousquet, Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Montréal
Christophe Bedos, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Susan Law, Department of Family Medicine, McGill University and St Mary’s Hospital
Aimée Dawson, Faculty of Dentistry, Laval University,
Jill Torie, Director of Specialised Services and Assistant Director of Public Health, Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay (CBHSSJB)
Anne Foro, Director of planning and programming, Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay)
Martin Chartier, Acting Chief Dental Officer, Canada Public Health Agency
Elise Bertrand, Dentist Officer, Integrated Center for health and social services of the Laurentians

In collaboration with : Fondation de l’Ordre des dentistes du Québec
Réseau de recherche en santé des populations du Québec
Institut de recherche en santé publique de l’Université de Montréal

The goal of this project is to develop a research partnership with the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay in order to evaluate oral health care within the Cree communities of northern Quebec.
Aboriginal people, especially those who are living in rural and remote communities, experience higher rates of oral disease compared to the general Canadian population. The root causes of these oral health disparities are multidimensional and embedded deep within the social and structural characteristics of communities.
The burden of poor oral health and the resulting costs are considerable. In addition, oral diseases have common risk factors with leading chronic diseases.
Dr. Emami leads a multidisciplinary team that works with the Cree communities around this project aimed to evaluate the integration of oral health in primary health care. The project is based on Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) approach which has been recognized as a promising solution for the challenges of rural and remote dental service provision, especially with Aboriginal communities. The POHC approach puts emphasis on prevention, community involvement, local leadership, and a multi-sectorial approach to address equity, population-centred service delivery and healthcare systems complexity